Displaying 1-15 of 51

Stephen Railton

Stephen Railton teaches American literature at the University of Virginia. The author of books on James Fenimore Cooper, the American Renaissance, and Mark Twain, as well as numerous articles, he is currently exploring the uses of electronic technology to advance the study and teaching of literature. Toward this end, he has created several large Web sites, including Mark Twain in His Times: An Electronic Archive, Uncle Tom’s Cabin and American Culture: A Multi-Media Archive, and FAULKNER AT VIRGINIA: AN AUDIO ARCHIVE.


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Jack N. Rakove

Jack Rakove is the W. R. Coe Professor of History and American Studies and professor of political science at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1980. He is the author of The Beginnings of National Politics: An Interpretive History of the Continental Congress (1979); James Madison and the Creation of the American Republic (revised edition, 2001); Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution (1996), which won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize in history; Declaring Rights: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1997); The Annotated U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence (Harvard, 2009); and Revolutionaries: A New History of the Invention of America (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010). He has also contributed essays and articles to numerous scholarly collections, law reviews, and newspapers. In 1998 he testified at the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee hearings on the background and history of impeachment and has served as a consultant and expert witness in the recent litigation over the use of sampling procedures in the decennial federal census.


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Arnold Rampersad

Arnold Rampersad, Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature at Princeton University, is the author of The Life of Langston Hughes and editor of The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes.


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Mary Lynn Rampolla

Mary Lynn Rampolla (PhD, University of Toronto) is associate professor of history at Trinity Washington University in Washington, D.C., and she chairs the History Program at Trinity (Washington) University.  Her scholarly work focuses on medieval and early modern Europe, and her publications include articles in Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies and entries in the Dictionary of the Middle Ages.  She has several articles in an encyclopedia called Holy People of the World.  She is active in the fields of history and composition and frequently presents papers at the annual International Medieval Congress at the University of Western Michigan.


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Don Ranly

Don Ranly, professor emeritus of journalism at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, was formerly director of the magazine sequence at the school for twenty-eight years.   He is coauthor of News Reporting and Writing, Tenth Edition (2011), Telling the Story, Fourth Edition (2010), and Beyond the Inverted Pyramid (1993), and is the author of Publication Editing (1999), and the editor of Principles of American Journalism (1997). He has conducted more than 1,000 writing, editing, and publishing seminars for corporations, associations and organizations, and individual magazine, newspaper, and publishing companies.


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Ron Rash

Ron Rash is the author of the prizewinning novels One Foot in Eden and Saints at the River, as well as three collections of poetry and two of short stories. He is the recipient of an O. Henry Prize and the James Still Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. For Saints at the River he received the 2004 Weatherford Award for Best Novel and the 2005 SEBA Best Book Award for Fiction. Rash holds the John Parris Chair in Appalachian Studies at Western Carolina University and lives in Clemson, South Carolina.


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Eric Rauchway

Eric Rauchway has written for the Financial Times and the Los Angeles Times. He teaches at the University of California, Davis, and is the author of Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt’s America (H&W, 2003).


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Supryia M. Ray

Supryia M. Ray is a writer, editor, and English teacher. A summa cum laude graduate of the University of Miami, she has assisted Ross Murfin in the research and preparation of more than a dozen volumes in the Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism series and authored "Contextual Documents and Illustrations" for the second edition of The Scarlet Letter. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1998, served as a law clerk on the U.S. District Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals, entered private practice as a litigator, and then performed public-interest environmental advocacy in Washington, D.C. She also served for two years with Literacy AmeriCorps, teaching adult learners a variety of subjects including English, reading, writing, and public speaking. She now divides her time between teaching and writing.


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Janie Rees-Miller

Janie Rees-Miller is director of the English as a Second Language program at Marietta College, Ohio. In research and teaching, she is concerned with the interface between theory and practice and with making linguistics accessible to nonlinguists. She is coeditor with Mark Aronoff of The Handbook of Linguistics.


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Kevin Reilly

Kevin Reilly is a professor of humanities at Raritan Valley College and has taught at Rutgers, Columbia, and Princeton Universities. Cofounder and first president of the World History Association, Reilly has written numerous articles on the teaching of history, and has edited a number of works in world history including The Introductory History Course for the AHA and the World History syllabus collection. A specialist in immigration history, Reilly incorporated his research in creating the "Modern Global Migrations" globe at Ellis Island. His work on the history of racism led to the editing of Racism: A Global Reader. He was a Fulbright scholar in Brazil and Jordan and a NEH fellow in Greece, Oxford UK, and India. Awards include the Community College Humanities Association’s Distinguished Educator of the Year and the World History Association's Pioneer Award. He has also served the American Historical Association in various capacities, including the governing Council. He is currently writing a global history of racism.


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Ellen Kuhl Repetto

Ellen Kuhl Repetto (M.A., University of Massachusetts Boston) is a freelance editor and writer who has contributed to more than twenty composition readers, handbooks, and rhetorics. She is the author of The Bedford/St. Martin's Textbook Reader (2003), Readings for Discoveries: A Collection of Short Essays (2006), and Hope over Hardship: A History of the Boston Home, 1881 - 2006 (2007).


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Displaying 1-15 of 51