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Stacey Waite

Stacey Waite is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln where she teaches courses in Composition and Rhetoric and Gender Studies. Waite has published articles and essays on the teaching of writing in numerous journals and anthologies, including Writing on the Edge, Feminist Teacher, and Reader: Essays in Reader-Oriented Theory, Criticism, and Pedagogy. Waite was co-editor of The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2011 (Parlor Press, 2012). Having worked with both the Western Pennsylvania Writing Project, and currently with the Nebraska Writing Project, Waite directs and contributes to many writing programs and projects in her community—among them the Young Writers Camp in Lincoln, Nebraska, the Louder than a Bomb Omaha Youth poetry Festival, and the Summer Institute for Teachers.

With an interest both in critical and creative writing, Waite has published four collections of poems: Choke (winner of the 2004 Frank O'Hara Prize), Love Poem to Androgyny (winner of the 2006 Main Street Rag Chapbook Competition), the lake has no saint (winner of the 2008 Snowbound Prize from Tupelo Press), and Butch Geography (Tupelo Press, 2013). Waite’s poems have been published most recently in The Cream City Review, Bloom, Indiana Review, and Black Warrior Review. Waite is the co-host of the radio podcast Air Schooner produced by Prairie Schooner and is Senior Poetry Editor for Tupelo Quarterly.

Waite has been teaching writing using Ways of Reading since 1999, has worked on the selections and apparatus for the book since 2006, and is now co-editor of the textbook. She has given several invited talks addressing the pedagogy of the textbook and working with teachers of first-year writing to scaffold and shape their semesters using Ways of Reading.


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Nancy A. Walker

Nancy A. Walker is a professor of English and former director of the women's studies program at Vanderbilt University. Previously she has taught at Stephens College, where she served as chair of the department of languages and literature from 1984 to 1989. A specialist in American women writers, she has published A Very Serious Thing: Women's Humor and American Culture (1988); Feminist Alternatives: Irony and Fantasy in the Contemporary Novel by Women (1990); and The Disobedient Writer: Women and Narrative Tradition (1995). She is editor of Redressing the Balance: American Women's Humor from the Colonies to the 1980s (1988); Communication: The Autobiography of Rachel Maddux (1991); and Kate Chopin's The Awakening: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism (Bedford Books, 1993).


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Keith Walters

Keith Walters is professor of applied linguistics at Portland State University. Much of his research focuses on language and identity in North Africa, especially Tunisia, and the United States. He has also taught freshman composition and English as a second/foreign language.


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David Wann

David Wann is the author of many books including The New Normal, Simple Prosperity: Finding Real Wealth in a Sustainable Lifestyle and the bestselling Affluenza, which he co-authored. He lives in Golden, Colorado.


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Elizabeth Wardle

Elizabeth Wardle is Associate Professor and the Director of Writing Outreach Programs in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Central Florida.  Her research interests center on genre theory, the transfer of writing-related knowledge, and composition pedagogy.  She is currently conducting a study examining the impact of smaller class size on the learning of composition students, as well as a study examining the impact of the writing-about-writing pedagogy on student writing and attitudes about writing.


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Alison M. Warriner

Alison M. Warriner is Coordinator of Composition, Director of Writing Across the Curriculum, and professor of English at California State University, East Bay, where she has also been Director of the Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiative and the Summer Writing Institutes. Previously she was Director of Communications at Sacred Heart University. She is a coauthor of Academic Literacy: A Statement of Competencies Expected of Students Entering California’s Public Colleges and Universities (2002) and of the Expository Reading and Writing Course (ERWC) that is currently being introduced as Senior English into California public high schools through the Early Assessment Program of the CSU Chancellor’s Office.


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Lawrence Weinstein

Lawrence Weinstein taught the first-year writing course at Harvard University and cofounded Harvard’s Writing Center. For nearly thirty years, he was a member of the English Department at Bentley University, where he directed the Writing Center and the Expository Writing Program. His book on the teaching of writing, Writing at the Threshold, was a longtime bestseller of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Other books by Weinstein include Grammar for the Soul, Grammar Moves (with his colleague Thomas Finn), and Writing Doesn’t Have to Be Lonely. Plays by Weinstein have been performed in Boston, Dallas, and New York.

(Photo credit: Jonathan Kannair)


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Christian R. Weisser

Christian Weisser is an Associate Professor of English at Penn State Berks, where he coordinates both the Professional Writing Program and the Writing Across the Curriculum Program.  Christian is the Editor of Composition Forum, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal in rhetoric and composition. Much of his research focuses upon the ecology of writing and environmental rhetoric, and he is the author or editor of half a dozen books and numerous articles on this subject, including Moving Beyond Academic Discourse, Natural Discourse (with Sid Dobrin), and The Locations of Composition (with Christopher Keller). Christian enjoys teaching courses in technical writing, environmental rhetoric, and the discourse of sustainability.


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Patricia White

Patricia White is Associate Professor and Chair of the Program in Film and Media Studies at Swarthmore College. She is the author of Uninvited: Classical Hollywood Cinema and Lesbian Representability (Indiana UP, 1999) and numerous articles and chapters on film theory and culture. She is writing a book on women filmmakers and world cinema. She is a member of the editorial collective of the leading English-language journal of feminism and film, Camera Obscura, and she currently chairs the board of the nonprofit feminist media arts organization and independent distributor Women Make Movies. With Timothy Corrigan, coauthor of The Film Experience, she is editing an anthology of essays in classical and contemporary film theory.


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Edward M. White

Edward M. White has written or edited thirteen books and about one hundred articles or book chapters on writing, writing instruction, and writing assessment.  In 2007, he coedited (with a former student) his fifth textbook for college writing students, The Promise of America, and fully revised the fourth edition of his book for teachers, Assigning, Responding, Evaluating.  His best-known books are Teaching and Assessing Writing, which won a Shaughnessey award from the Modern Language Association in 1994, and Assessment of Writing, an MLA research volume, in 1996.   After taking early retirement in 1997 as an emeritus professor of English at the CSU San Bernardino campus, where he was named “Outstanding Professor” in 1994, he joined the University of Arizona English department, where he has taught graduate courses in writing assessment, writing research, and writing program administration, completing his fifty-first year of college teaching in 2009.  Now a visiting scholar at the University of Arizona, he is coauthoring a book on evaluating writing programs and is continuing to publish articles and book chapters.


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Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel is the author of more than fifty books, including Night, his harrowing account of his experiences in Nazi concentration camps. The book, first published in 1955, was selected for Oprah’s Book Club in 2006, and continues to be an important reminder of man’s capacity for inhumanity. Wiesel is Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University, and lives with his family in New York City. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.


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Displaying 1-15 of 20